Noise launches first smart eyewear i1 with motion sensor, mic for calling and more

After smartwatches and TWS, Noise launched its first smart eyewear in India. The eyewear titled ‘i1’ is developed by Noise labs and comes with a host of features including a motion estimation, motion compensation (MEMS) mic for calling, magnetic charging, and hands-free voice control and more features. Smart glasses aren’t very common in India. So far only Bose has launched smart glasses but those fall in the premium category. Noise, with its new eyewear, aims to make smart glasses more accessible. That is also one of the reasons why the Noise eyewear has been priced lower than its competition.

Talking about the smartglasses, Amit Khatri, Noise co-founder had said, “We are proud to introduce Noise i1, the first pair of stylish, smart eyewear, developed in Noise Labs. Keeping an eye on the future, we have designed our smart eyewear to give the purest tech experience to anyone looking for the best- in -class audio experience. We’ve packed it with all the essential features, and this is the next step in giving our users a completely seamless connected experience.”

Noise smart eyewear i1: Price and availability
Noise smart eyewear i1 has been launched in India at a price of Rs 5,999. Buyers can get the limited edition device from the official website of Noise. The smartglasses are offered in the classic black colour.

Noise smart eyewear i1: Specifications
The Noise smart glasses are not equipped with cameras unlike the RayBan Stories. So if you want cameras in your smart eyewear, Noise i1 is not the one for you. The Noise smartglasses feature a revolutionary guided audio design to ensure that the music flows straight into your ears. The design also manages to block out the surrounding noise so that you can focus on the music solely.

. The device offers over 9 hours of playtime on a single charge. It also has the most recent Bluetooth 5.1 connectivity, ensuring that your eyewear connects to your phone as soon as the temples are opened, eliminating the need to unlock your phone and offering excellent sound quality up to 10 metres away from your smartphone. It can deliver 120 minutes of playtime on a 15-minute charge.

The smart eyewear also features multi-functional touch controls that enable users to accept and reject calls, manage music, and activate the voice assistant. It is a complete package with UVA/B 99% protection against sun rays in sunglasses lenses and changeable blue light filtering transparent lenses for reducing eye strain and providing clear vision when using laptops, etc.

Microphones are the new gaming status symbol

Nobody needed a gaming mic in the late ’90s. Hell, webcams barely even existed yet—if you were attending QuakeCon and wanted to inspire a roiling envy among your fellow PC elitists, your best bet was a garish, chromed-out case. You know what I’m talking about: the crystalline chassis, the glittering water cooling kits, the monolithic fans that sounded like a spaceship taking off. This was the threshold that every up-and-coming geek was expected to aspire to. No peripherals, no bells and whistles, just a big machine and a chunky monitor, pumping out Counter-Strike headshots all night long. You could take that PC to your local LAN party and show everyone who’s boss.

Microphones have morphed from a fringe boutique curiosity to an out-an-out necessity

In this wonderful era, the only people who owned computer microphones used them for their day jobs.

Decades have turned over since then. Today if you scroll through the vainglorious posts on r/Battlestations(opens in new tab), you will notice a new omnipresent trend: massive, studio-ready microphones perched on everyone’s desks, as if the owners are about to either record a podcast or play 10 hours of Apex Legends for a live audience. Mics are everywhere. They are now a stylistic orthodoxy, like wearing a pocket square to a wedding.

There have certainly been other innovations to the gamer aesthetic: Few people pack a 30-inch CRT screen these days, and we don’t purchase graphics cards emblazoned with horrifying low-res aliens. But the biggest sea change in the community is that niggling desire to broadcast your voice with the sonorous depth of a millionaire Twitch streamer, even if it’s to an audience of three on Discord.

Microphones have morphed from a fringe boutique curiosity to an out-an-out necessity. Our battlestations look sad and malnourished without them.

“A great audio set-up will definitely strike jealousy in someone,” says Andrew, a 15-year old Floridian who showed off his rig in a choice r/Battlestations post earlier this month. Take a look, and you’ll find a scarlet PC chassis, a starchy computer chair, and yes, a dangling, mesh-tipped microphone. “It’s the same when I see someone with a nice keyboard or whatever. Everything you have will make someone jealous.”

As a zoomer, Andrew is at the forefront of the generational turnover within the PC contingency. He wanted a microphone superior to the chintzy plastic headsets that remained the standard among matchmaking queues throughout the 2000s and 2010s. But as gamers became celebrities in the latter half of the decade—as the stereotype shifted from basement-dwelling grognard towards a Kool Aid-dyed teen in an LA mansion—so too did the men and women in their wake.

There is truly nothing wrong with my headset. My friends can hear me just fine, and I rarely need to record professional audio. But after internalizing the Twitch norms and seeing all the fancy HyperX mics trickle across the timeline, I too have started to feel a primordial gamer inadequacy that brings me back to my teenage years. If you want to know how vulnerable you are to the whims of consumer movements—even at the supposedly solid age of 31—spend a day staring at PC furnishments until your own desk appears naked and meager without an amplifier.

“I think that all the kids want a ‘complete’ streaming setup like they see their favorite streamers online have. So whether or not they use it for streaming or just casually, it’s become a part of a complete setup,” says another poster on r/Battlestations, who opted for a $99 Blue Yeti. “I think it has everything to do with wanting to be like the streamers they look up to.”

It’s hard to know when, exactly, this revolution began. Livestreaming is older than anyone gives it credit for—kids were running livestreams on local access TV in the early 1990s. I was watching Stickam in high school, which was now 15 years ago. Laptops didn’t even have built-in mics back in those days, so external equipment was a requirement, not a flex. (Case in point: Some of my happiest gaming memories occurred during vanilla World of Warcraft raids, where I coordinated healing rotations with the help of a tinny, beige microphone borrowed from my parents.) Xbox Live certainly helped bring voice chat beyond hardcore PC Ventrilo servers and into the gaming mainstream, but cheapo tinny headsets remained the go-to for years.

My best guess is that dedicated mics became more widely adopted when young people started to get the bulk of their gaming information from YouTube, because Ninja, Shroud, and Pokimane spend much of their public life with their faces partially obscured by a fuzzy black mass.

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“Why are microphones so popular in Battlestations?” reads the title to a Reddit thread posted in the summer of 2018, which I’d argue represented the absolute zenith of the gamer-celebrity ascendency. (It was the year Drake played Fortnite on Twitch—I rest my case.) Theories trickle through the replies, all orbiting around the same core premise: Everyone imagines themselves as a YouTuber.

“Streaming has exploded as a form of entertainment,” says Adam, a 26-year-old in Canada and another Blue Yeti owner, in an interview with PC Gamer. “So every stream is advertising a ‘battlestation,’ so to speak.” Viewer numbers do indeed keep rising year after year.

Personally, I don’t harbor any delusions of social media stardom. The idea of managing a community filled with children on lunch break seems totally soul-killing, as does the idea of playing exactly one videogame for thousands of hours. I doubt I’m alone in that, and I imagine that many of you reading this story feel the same way. That said, Leif Johnson, a longtime journalist and PC Gamer contributor, does highlight one way microphone envy seeps into all of us aging greybeards. He recalls a recent Valorant session with his usual group of buddies. One of them had stopped using his external microphone in favor of a headset, which crackled with an unfavorable fidelity compared to the resonant warmth he was used to.

“I admit making some subtle digs trying to get him to go back to [the other mic,]” says Johnson. “In games like that I like to be able to hear the person as clearly as possible, so I like it when they have a quality mic.”

This is the future we’re headed towards, man. As microphones become more popular, and as we become more accustomed to our friends speaking with the pristine clarity of podcasters, we are slowly going to become less patient with anyone still relying on a crappy old headset. Yes, that was satisfactory in the early Xbox Live days, when we called out MechWarrior strategies on a poverty bitrate.

But in 2022 gamers are weaned on the texturous depth of Twitch streamers and YouTube hustlers. If you join the party with a microphone that makes you sound like Leeroy Jenkins, expect to be laughed out of the room. And everyone who’s anyone knows you need that Rode mic arm, not some $15 imitator off Amazon.

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Don’t expect this trend to reverse course anytime soon. We are all going to be external microphone people eventually—for reasons both aesthetic and utilitarian. It is yet another thing to buy in a hobby that continually moves the goalposts. (The RAM, the graphics cards, the chiseled decals on the case, the utterly unnecessary water cooling system, and so on and so forth forever.) The kids set the rules, and we race to catch up, which I suppose is how every subculture is supposed to work.

I just hate knowing that I’m about to be out $150 in order to feel a little less inadequate. But hey, at least my voice will sound fabulous.

 

512 Audio announces its Tempest large-diaphragm USB studio mic

512 Audio is a new brand to us and maybe for many of you. The Austin-based company makes audio equipment backed by Warm Audio, and they have announced the Tempest, a “true” large-diaphragm USB studio mic.

512 Audio says the Tempest draws on the design and sound profile of its Warm Audio WA-47jr studio condenser mic and features a vintage-inspired, large-diaphragm condenser capsule and 24-bit / 48kHz resolution that brings pristine studio sound to your desktop. Here’s what the company’s press release had to say.

512 Audio Tempest

Engineered to capture polished, detailed audio for podcasts, live streams, acoustic instruments, and vocal performances, Tempest is the simplest way to get true studio sound. Initially debuting at CES, Tempest (MSRP $159.99) is coming to Amazon in July and other authorized retailers worldwide.

“Tempest is not your typical USB microphone,” said Bryce Young, founder, and CEO of Warm Audio and 512 Audio. “We’re very excited to be offering a true, large-diaphragm studio mic that can easily connect to any creator’s setup without requiring additional hardware & cables. Tempest bridges our experience in creating high-end studio microphones with the convenience of today’s digital setups.”

At the center of the Tempest design is a true, large-diaphragm, vintage-inspired 34mm gold-plated condenser capsule that shares design DNA with the best-selling WA-47jr studio microphone. Tempest delivers tight lows, nuanced midrange, and pristine high end with a full 20Hz – 20kHz frequency response. The fixed cardioid pickup pattern captures what’s in front of the mic and rejects surrounding ambient noise, letting any source you put in front of it come through loud and clear. With 24-bit, 48kHz resolution capabilities, Tempest captures high-fidelity audio with exceptional clarity and detail for modern hi-res recording.

Streamlining the home recording setup, Tempest allows creators to professionally record and stream straight to their PC or Mac with modern USB-C connectivity; no additional audio interface or studio hardware is required. Essential for USB plug-and-play workflows, Tempest features microphone gain, zero-latency headphone volume monitoring, and mute for full control over your sound; no software is required. Tempest also includes a premium desktop stand and professional, low-profile shockmount to reduce unwanted vibrations and rumble when connecting to a mic stand or boom arm. From pristine streams and rich podcasts to stellar vocal performances, Tempest captures every detail with the richness and depth you’d expect from a studio microphone.

 

People of this country who are getting deaf by applying earphone, be careful as soon as these symptoms appear

If we look around us, we see many people who are wearing earphones in their ears. In today’s time, many people use earphones to talk on calls in addition to watching videos and listening to audio. However, did you know that these small earphones (side effects of earphone use) can make you deaf? Yes, and that’s happening in one country. In fact, a quarter of the population here is becoming deaf due to earphones being put in the ears. Now we tell you about the country and about the harm and avoid tips of installing earphones.

In France, 25 percent of people have low hearing ability – in fact, research conducted by the National Institute of Health and Medical Institute has claimed that one in four people in France is having trouble hearing. Let us also tell you all that this is the first time that such a large-scale research has been done in France. It included about 460 people between the ages of 18 and 75. Yes, and the researchers claim that the reason for hearing less is social isolation, depression and listening to music in a loud voice.

If we look around us, we see many people who are wearing earphones in their ears. In today’s time, many people use earphones to talk on calls in addition to watching videos and listening to audio. However, did you know that these small earphones (side effects of earphone use) can make you deaf? Yes, and that’s happening in one country. In fact, a quarter of the population here is becoming deaf due to earphones being put in the ears. Now we tell you about the country and about the harm and avoid tips of installing earphones.

In France, 25 percent of people have low hearing ability – in fact, research conducted by the National Institute of Health and Medical Institute has claimed that one in four people in France is having trouble hearing. Let us also tell you all that this is the first time that such a large-scale research has been done in France. It included about 460 people between the ages of 18 and 75. Yes, and the researchers claim that the reason for hearing less is social isolation, depression and listening to music in a loud voice.

JLab Go Air Sport True headphones review: Cheap running headphones with a surprising punch

While you have to make a couple of sacrifices, the Go Air Sport True headphones from JLab perform far better than you would expect at this price.
Pros: – Very cheap
– Good sound for price
– Comfortable and light
– Water- and dust-resistant
Cons: – Frustrating charging system
– Fiddly touch controls
– Feel very cheap
Running can quickly become boring, the gym is a melting pot of bassy music, grunts and weights smacking the ground, and even when you’re squeezing in a quick home workout, the sound of your own breathing can be something you’d rather not have to deal with.

With this in mind, a pair of headphones for your workouts can be an essential purchase. But if you’re looking to keep the costs low, your options become limited with most of the best earbuds and headphones for exercise exceeding £100.

How do they look and feel?
It won’t come as any surprise to hear that, at this price point, you’re not exactly getting a luxury product. Both the charging case and headphones are made of a cheap-feeling, but very sturdy, plastic.

However, when you actually put the headphones in, this isn’t a problem. In fact, these headphones feel great when you’re wearing them. They are lightweight, and thanks to the hooked design, they stay secure throughout your workout.

I have frequently had headphones come out when I’ve been running, requiring an adjustment every so often, but the Go Air Sport True stayed in without any issues.

However, because of the shape of these headphones, the sound can often dampen as the earbud comes out a little bit during exercise. A quick tap back into place solves this issue though and is a common experience when using running headphones.

Thanks to the lightweight design, these headphones stayed comfortable for long periods of time. It took a bit over an hour of exercise to notice any discomfort with them in.

Do they sound good?
The most important question: can headphones that only cost £29.99 produce a good sound? Surprisingly, yes. Of course, these are by no means going to blow you away, and they certainly aren’t going to compete with more expensive headphones, but for the price tag we were thoroughly impressed.

You get three different equalisation (EQ) settings: JLab Signature, Balanced and Bass Boost. There is a noticeable switch between these, especially on certain songs.

How do they look and feel?
It won’t come as any surprise to hear that, at this price point, you’re not exactly getting a luxury product. Both the charging case and headphones are made of a cheap-feeling, but very sturdy, plastic.

However, when you actually put the headphones in, this isn’t a problem. In fact, these headphones feel great when you’re wearing them. They are lightweight, and thanks to the hooked design, they stay secure throughout your workout.

I have frequently had headphones come out when I’ve been running, requiring an adjustment every so often, but the Go Air Sport True stayed in without any issues.

However, because of the shape of these headphones, the sound can often dampen as the earbud comes out a little bit during exercise. A quick tap back into place solves this issue though and is a common experience when using running headphones.

Thanks to the lightweight design, these headphones stayed comfortable for long periods of time. It took a bit over an hour of exercise to notice any discomfort with them in.

Do they sound good?
The most important question: can headphones that only cost £29.99 produce a good sound? Surprisingly, yes. Of course, these are by no means going to blow you away, and they certainly aren’t going to compete with more expensive headphones, but for the price tag we were thoroughly impressed.

You get three different equalisation (EQ) settings: JLab Signature, Balanced and Bass Boost. There is a noticeable switch between these, especially on certain songs.

This problem is slightly alleviated thanks to the playtime of the headphones. You can get over 32 hours from one charge. If you’re only using these when you exercise, you won’t find yourself having to awkwardly dangle them from your wall to charge all too often.

While these earbuds aren’t waterproof, they are water- and dust-resistant. This means some light rain, sweat and general splashes will be absolutely fine – just make sure you don’t drop them in puddles or tubs of water.

Should you buy the JLab Go Air True?
It feels hard to massively fault the JLab Go Air True headphones. The company labels themselves as an affordable audio company, and with these running headphones, that’s exactly what you’re getting.

If you are after an impressive audio performance, or headphones that offer a premium look and feel, these are not the headphones for you. But for something cheap and decent for the occasional bit of exercise, these are a great choice.

They are affordable, offer a long battery life, fit comfortably, and while the audio is by no means incredible, it will provide you with the quality you need for podcasts, audio books or that quick shot of bass-heavy music to get you through your run.

Sony WH-1000XM5 review: Great ANC and audio, questionable design

Introduction, design, and features
It was around six years ago that Sony decided it should go after Bose and make a truly remarkable wireless ANC headphone. Back then, if you wanted a wireless noise-cancelling headphone to take with you on flights to cocoon you from the racket of the jet engines, you would buy a Bose QuietComfort – end of. That changed when Sony released the MDR-1000X. And over the next couple of years, the two would trade blows.

The latest retaliatory effort from Sony comes in the form of the WH-1000XM5. It’s the fifth iteration of Sony’s flagship wireless ANC headphone and it’s the most radical yet because it boasts an all-new design and new drivers.

Design & features

For the first time in years, Sony has completely revamped the look and feel of its flagship wireless ANC headphone. The headband is thinner and it extends as a single piece all the way down to the earcups. And the earcups have a clean polygonal shape. Overall, it just looks sleeker and more minimalistic than previous versions.

Comfort is an important aspect of this headphone and so it has an all-plastic construction to keep weight down – just 250g. The leather used in the headband and earpads is also a newly developed “soft fit leather” material that Sony claims fits snugly while relieving pressure.

Sony has definitely nailed down the comfort aspect of this headphone. I recently took these on my trip to WWDC 2022 and it never felt uncomfortable during the long flight to the US.

However, my major gripe with the design of the WH-1000XM5 is that they don’t fold. This inability to fold for storage makes them a pain to carry because the carrying case is substantially bigger. Also, the way they swivel is not ideal. When you take them off and place them on your neck, the earcups don’t swivel and lay flat on your body. If you want them to be flat, you have to swivel the earcups so that they face upwards and away from you. Sure, you could say it’s a minor issue, but it’s also one that the WH-1000XM4 didn’t have. And to me, it shows a lack of attention to detail on Sony’s part insofar as the design is concerned.

Fortunately, some other aspects of the WH-1000XM5 are improved. Like its predecessor, there are touch controls on the right earcups and they have never been more accurate or responsive. I could easily use it to skip tracks and adjust the volume. The quick aware mode is still present, so if you cover the right earcup, the headphone immediately lowers the volume of your content and goes into the ambient sound mode so you can hear what’s going on around you or have a quick conversation with somebody.

Like any high-end wireless headphone, the WH-1000XM5 has an accompanying app. In this case, it’s Sony’s familiar Headphones app – the same app used to manage other Sony personal audio devices like the WF-1000XM4 and older WH-1000XM4. This app lets you manage almost all aspects of the headphone, including customising the touch controls, adjusting the level of noise-cancelling, tweaking the sound via the equaliser, choosing the kind of wireless connection, and more. The level of customisation is high and I have no complaints about the app.

Speaking of wireless connection, the WH-1000XM5 supports multipoint connection so it can pair with up to two devices simultaneously. It switches between source devices very quickly. As for codecs, there’s support for the usual AAC, SBC, and also LDAC – which should satisfy most iOS users and owners of newer Android devices. Battery life, according to Sony, is up to 30 hours with ANC on. On my recent trip to WWDC, it had 30 per cent charge remaining when I reached the hotel after the 20-plus hour trip.

Noise cancellation performance

Like any high-end wireless headphone, the WH-1000XM5 has an accompanying app. In this case, it’s Sony’s familiar Headphones app – the same app used to manage other Sony personal audio devices like the WF-1000XM4 and older WH-1000XM4. This app lets you manage almost all aspects of the headphone, including customising the touch controls, adjusting the level of noise-cancelling, tweaking the sound via the equaliser, choosing the kind of wireless connection, and more. The level of customisation is high and I have no complaints about the app.

Speaking of wireless connection, the WH-1000XM5 supports multipoint connection so it can pair with up to two devices simultaneously. It switches between source devices very quickly. As for codecs, there’s support for the usual AAC, SBC, and also LDAC – which should satisfy most iOS users and owners of newer Android devices. Battery life, according to Sony, is up to 30 hours with ANC on. On my recent trip to WWDC, it had 30 per cent charge remaining when I reached the hotel after the 20-plus hour trip.

Noise cancellation performance

Is it better than Bose’s newest QuietComfort 45, the winner of the Best Noise Cancelling Headphones category in our last Tech Awards? Maybe, but only very slightly in extreme conditions. Generally speaking, the two offer very comparable ANC performance.

What about against the WH-1000XM4? I’d say the WH-1000XM5 is better too. But again, the margins are small and it really depends on the environment. For some reason, on a plane, I think the WH-1000XM5’s ANC is more effective. At home, however, I find the two to be equally competent and there’s little to separate them.

What’s indisputable, however, is how much the ambient sound mode has improved. It’s still not as good as Apple’s implementation — one really has to wonder how the people at Cupertino managed to do ambient sound so well and to nail it on the first try — but it’s a whole lot better than previous Sony headphones. It now sounds more natural and less digitised, so it gives you greater confidence that you are hearing your environment in its entirety.

Mic and sound quality

Is it better than Bose’s newest QuietComfort 45, the winner of the Best Noise Cancelling Headphones category in our last Tech Awards? Maybe, but only very slightly in extreme conditions. Generally speaking, the two offer very comparable ANC performance.

What about against the WH-1000XM4? I’d say the WH-1000XM5 is better too. But again, the margins are small and it really depends on the environment. For some reason, on a plane, I think the WH-1000XM5’s ANC is more effective. At home, however, I find the two to be equally competent and there’s little to separate them.

What’s indisputable, however, is how much the ambient sound mode has improved. It’s still not as good as Apple’s implementation — one really has to wonder how the people at Cupertino managed to do ambient sound so well and to nail it on the first try — but it’s a whole lot better than previous Sony headphones. It now sounds more natural and less digitised, so it gives you greater confidence that you are hearing your environment in its entirety.

Mic and sound quality

Is it better than Bose’s newest QuietComfort 45, the winner of the Best Noise Cancelling Headphones category in our last Tech Awards? Maybe, but only very slightly in extreme conditions. Generally speaking, the two offer very comparable ANC performance.

What about against the WH-1000XM4? I’d say the WH-1000XM5 is better too. But again, the margins are small and it really depends on the environment. For some reason, on a plane, I think the WH-1000XM5’s ANC is more effective. At home, however, I find the two to be equally competent and there’s little to separate them.

What’s indisputable, however, is how much the ambient sound mode has improved. It’s still not as good as Apple’s implementation — one really has to wonder how the people at Cupertino managed to do ambient sound so well and to nail it on the first try — but it’s a whole lot better than previous Sony headphones. It now sounds more natural and less digitised, so it gives you greater confidence that you are hearing your environment in its entirety.

Mic and sound quality

And now, even after spending weeks and taking the WH-1000XM5 with me on an ultra-long-haul flight, I still can’t quite wrap my head around them. They are not bad by any means; in fact, the ANC and sound quality are spectacular. But it seems like if they just did a couple of things different, it could have been a home run. All in all, the WH-1000XM5 feels like a missed opportunity and a classic case of “so near yet so far.”

Sony’s Latest Noise-Cancelling Headphones Live Up to the Hype

For the past few years, those in search of serious sound quality from their noise-cancelling headphones have almost uniformly sworn allegiance to Sony. So expectations are precipitously high now that a new flagship offering has joined the brand’s storied lineage in the form of the WH-1000XM5, the successors to 2020’s truly beloved WH-1000XM4. With some fierce audiophile-worthy competition having recently joined the high-end fray in Apple’s AirPods Max, can the OG music lover’s choice still cut it?

Having spent hours jamming out to our playlists with these over-ear cans, there’s little doubt in our mind that these live up to our dizzying expectations and then some. Despite a somewhat contentious redesign, these are easily the best-sounding, best noise-blocking headphones we have used. Here’s why they’re a near-on essential purchase for commuting, your summer travels, and everything in between.

A total design shift?
As headphones go, the Sony WH-1000XM5 are reasonably controversial. Well, ‘controversial’ in the sense that there’s always going to be a subset of people who pretend not to like Abba or claim that Trent Alexander-Arnold isn’t a world-class right-back. Why the fuss? Sony’s oval-shaped on-ear cans inspired a generation of similarly designed headphones, so they’ve broken new stylistic ground in order to distinguish themselves all over again.

While the XM5s are certainly more curvaceous than the XM4s with a broader set of cups that add bulk to your ears, they don’t feel cumbersome to wear at all. The overall chassis is significantly tidier, with all the ports and buttons swept up on the bottom side of the cups for a cleaner profile and a more ergonomic placement for turning on things like noise cancellation and the like. In a world where headphones should absolutely be a consideration when building an appropriate office fit, these look the part wherever your workplace sits on the smart-casual divide.

The headband is definitely a highlight for us, losing the mechanical look from older models for a single arch that’s bolted on the top of each cup for a decidedly suaver look. Better still, those cups are comfier than previous iterations and sit snug on your ears, allowing a bit more room for the improved drivers while bolstering the build quality so it doesn’t feel so fragile if you’re stretching over hats or a larger-than-normal head. The downside? Avoid any sort of moisture as if your life depends on it. There’s still no water resistance of any kind on these cans, and Sony makes a concerted effort to remind you, placing a little flyer in the box with several big, red crosses over images of wearers listening to music while sweating or in the rain.

Sony WH-1000XM5 headphones
$398.00, Amazon

Noise-cancelling culture
As much as the Sony WH-1000XM5’s refresh delivers on an aesthetic front, those same design changes go a long way to passively shelter your ears from ambient sound and deliver that all-important noise-cancelling excellence. Previous iterations were excellent for long-distance traveling, drowning out the low-frequency drones of planes, trains and taxi-driver chit-chat, and you’ll still find that quality here, but now there’s even better blockage in higher-frequency sounds like voices or the screech of train brakes. All of which is is enhanced with the smart microphones that analyze your surroundings and send a message to the powerful drivers to pull the curtains around you for total focus on your music.

The ANC goes a long way in improving your music, but even with that turned off they sound superb. The new drivers are 10mm smaller than the previous model but pack a much more powerful punch, with new processing power to eke out the individual notes in your tunes for a much better listening experience than we ever got out of the WH-1000XM4s and we noticed vibrancy in voices we hadn’t heard before—Kendrick Lamar’s velvety voice on “Mother I Sober” is an emotional gut-punch with these on.

The sonic performance is expansive and rich, with a clear focus on spreading out the quality throughout the frequency range so you don’t miss anything. We enjoyed the hearty kick drum of Alt-J’s “The Actor”, which stayed out of the way of the brilliant vocals for an even listen. High-hats have a lively trill to them, and bass-heavy tunes like “Cooped Up” from Post Malone’s latest album thunder without being overbearing, which is great if you’re currently riding the Kate Bush wave post Stranger Things season 4.

Location tracking weirdness
Being a pair of highfalutin headphones, the XM5s don’t simply promise to look great and play back your favorite tunes in resplendent form. They also come with a few gimmicks to further stand out from the chasing pack. Download their app and it will track your location so it will adapt your sound for the optimal experience whether you’re walking down the street, sitting in an airport lounge, or hurtling along the countryside on a train.

As well as just slightly creepy, this trickery proved a bit wonky in turning the transparency mode on when we definitely didn’t want it to. More useful by far is a speak-to-chat feature for the office that dims the ANC and volume so you can still hear conversations without having to take the cans off. This also works with voice control so you can switch up tracks without taking your hands out of your pockets.

As for the one additional headphones spec that everyone really does care about, we got about 30 hours of noise-cancelling listening, which isn’t any longer than the XM4s, but still proved enough to see us through a full week’s worth of work days. It bumps up to 40 hours with the noise-cancelling turned off, but you’re better off leaning into the USB-C quick-charge refueling when these cans are running low on stamina.

Sony WH-1000XM5 verdict
To anyone who’s been paying attention to the music scene over the last few years, it should come as no surprise that the Sony WH-1000XM5s are as good as we expected. These are industry-leading headphones that continue to break new ground and build on the excellent work of the previous builds. Audiophiles expect true quality from their music, and while there are other brands like Apple and Bang & Olufsen that offer similar stylistic class and verve, there’s just no beating Sony in the audio department.

We’ve been lucky enough to slip many of the top noise-cancelling headphones over our ears, and for the longest time, Sony’s WH-1000XM4s were our favorite, so it seems fitting that the improved XM5s will receive that honor to take over from their predecessors.

There will be some who might turn their nose up at the design, but once you pull them over your ears, you probably won’t care about any of that, because you’ll be lost in your music anyway. The price tag is justified with the improved smart features that adapt your tunes on the fly based on what you’re doing, and we love being able to switch up tracks with just a few quick voice commands. Those of you with the previous XM4 models slung around their necks might not be keen to dish out more cash for the same sort of product, but if it’s the best-in-class you’re after, look no further.

 

SheerlinkTM Expands Audio Module Series

In association with the NAMM show in Anaheim, California (June 3-5, 2022), RTX A/S, (NASDAQ Copenhagen: RTX A/S), a leader in the design of resilient wireless audio solutions, today announced the expansion of their audio module series supporting the Sheerlink product solutions. The new RTX1291 2.4GHz module bears strong relations to the RTX1290 module but fits additional purposes due to its higher DSP performance.

RTX Sheerlink solutions for wireless audio products significantly reduce the complex wireless audio engineering and, what really matters these days, the uncertainty of the supply chain. Thus, enabling vendors to focus on realizing their own product ideas while improving their capability to deliver.

Multiple wireless configurations are available in the Sheerlink solution family, each with its own product use cases in mind. Supporting one to multiple wireless devices on a single system or going big with interconnected systems.

“Our customers have really embraced the possibilities we are providing. Product portfolios have revealed themselves and many have moved their wireless products into the leading game. With our exciting roadmaps and shared goals with our customers we intend to stay there, together,” said Torben Bjerregaard, Director of Product Management at RTX.

Besides modules, the Sheerlink product solutions include recommended designs for analog and digital circuitry as well as antenna design. Additional support packages give customers the freedom and flexibility to get products to market within a very short time frame without necessarily being radio experts.

Whether buying into one product, a partial or full product portfolio, RTX offers the capability and resources to deliver complete ODM solutions, including mechanic and packaging, product type approvals, production tests, and software customization.

About RTX

RTX A/S is a leading provider of wireless solutions – a growing business driven by digitalization and the demand for mobility and secure transmission. RTX has successfully finalized more than 1,000 wireless projects, ODM or OEM solutions in collaboration with global technology brands – from initial design, development, testing, and production.

RTX operates through 3 business areas: ProAudio, Enterprise, and Healthcare with a broad exposure to global brands in many different industries. RTX was founded in 1993 and the company is headquartered in Denmark with satellite locations in Hong Kong and the US.

How do we get the very best sound from our voice?

As a musician, you need a quality microphone that will capture the sounds from your music without losing them. Microphone eliminates background sounds and frees the singer-choir students to come out of their own layer in your recording studio.

As a singer-choir student, you need a mic that gives you the freedom to create music without worrying about noise on stage. Micphone is ideal for home studio setups and recording instruments away from the audience and stage.

AUDIO-TECHNICA AT2020 CARDIOID CONDENSER STUDIO XLR Microphone is an affordable and reliable mic for every musician. No more distractions for musicians; Microphone is perfect for any type of audio recording, including vocals and acoustic guitar recording. Microphone is compact, lightweight, and portable, and features an adjustable boom mic stand. Microphone is ideal for recording live, or for quick and easy mixing of audio or video projects. Microphone Features :

The price/performance standard in side address studio condenser microphone technology
Ideal for project/home studio applications; The noise level is 20 db spl
High spl handling and wide dynamic range provide unmatched versatility
Custom engineered low mass diaphragm provides extended frequency response and superior transient response
Cardioid polar pattern reduces pickup of sounds from the sides and rear, improving isolation of desired sound source. Output connector: integral 3 pin XLRM type
Black speckles on the mic is the finish of the item. Audio technica case style: R7

Do you want to enjoy music without having to change their hearing aid?

You’re in the market for new earphones, but you don’t know which ones to buy because the choice is overwhelming. Which one will give you a full range of sound? Or are there gonna be a lot of different colors that will make you look silly?

If you want to record amazing music, you need EAR headphones! With innovative design and sound quality, Ear Headphones boosts your music experience.

Don’t worry! PIONEER DJ HDJ-CUE1 – ON-EAR Headphones is here! Ear Headphones provide a full range of sound, at an affordable price that won’t break your budget. A lot of people want to experience the bass from their favorite music and headphones can provide it for them. However keeping things affordable is difficult when looking for the best headphones. Finding and buying the best pair of headphones can be a real challenge as you must ensure that it fits your ears, is comfortable and most importantly, doesn’t break.

Pioneer DJ HDJ-CUE1 – On-Ear Headphones – Black