The beginner DSLR is dead

The beginner-friendly DSLR was once a lynchpin of Nikon’s camera lineups, but the Japanese giant has confirmed that those days are over – it’s officially discontinued its two most affordable DSLRs.

In a statement, Nikon told us that “production has ceased on the D3500 and D5600”. It added that “the remaining stock will sell out at different rates across Europe, after which there will be no more incoming stock”. We’ve asked Nikon if this applies to worldwide stock, and will update this story when we hear back.

This means that if you want to buy a new Nikon D3500, which we still consider to be the best beginner DSLR you can buy, you’ll want to do so sooner rather than later. The Nikon D5600 is a slightly more powerful DSLR that ranks highly in our overall guide to the best DSLRs.

So why is Nikon discontinuing them? Interestingly, the camera giant went into a little more detail when explaining the reasons to us. It told us: “Nikon has focused its R&D efforts into mid to high end cameras and lenses, targeted at professional and hobbyist photographers. We are also focusing on strengthening products in response to younger hobbyists’ needs, for whom video is the primary focus.”

This renewed focus has resulted in the hugely impressive, if incredibly expensive, flagship Nikon Z9, which showcases the mirrorless tech Nikon is now pushing at the expense of its older DSLRs. It added: “We can see the benefits of this focused R&D strategy, with launches such as the highly successful Z 9, and we are pleased to say that the product pipeline continues to look strong over the coming years. It is with this product strategy in mind that production has ceased on both the D3500 and D5600 cameras.”

The missing pieces in this explanation are the huge impact of smartphones on entry-level camera sales and the steady decline in DSLR shipments over the last decade. While the D3500 and D5600 remain good cameras for beginners, Nikon simply isn’t able to justify making new stock of those models while investing in its fight to win the battle of the best mirrorless cameras. It’s the end of an era, then, but one we’ve seen coming in slow-motion over the past few years.

Analysis: Mirrorless cameras are now the default
The writing was on the wall for the Nikon D3500 and D5600 when the company told us last year that they were now “archived” products in Japan and that it “planned to continue selling these products for the time being” in the rest of the world.

But the fact this latest statement isn’t surprising doesn’t lessen its significance. Until very recently, DSLRs were the default format for professional photographers, and going only a little further back were the obvious choice for beginners looking for their first ‘proper’ camera.

Those days are now over. Nikon may have only discontinued two DSLRs, but the D3500 and D5600 were the two affordable, beginner-friendly models in its lineup. And while we haven’t seen a similar statement from Canon, it hasn’t released a beginner-friendly DSLR for over three years, since the Canon EOS Rebel SL3 / EOS 250D in 2019.

The official, and symbolic, end of those two Nikon models is a slight shame for consumer choice. But the number of people who prefer the DSLR format, which uses a mirror to reflect light directly into you eye through an optical viewfinder, is likely on the wane compared to those who feel more at home with the all-digital mirrorless experience.

Still, this doesn’t necessarily mean you should never consider buying a DSLR, even in 2022. If you prefer the larger bodies and superior battery lives of DSLRs to mirrorless cameras, there are some great bargains out there – we recently rounded up the best ones in our guide to the best second-hand DSLRs.

The Leica M-A Titan Is The Sleek Titanium Analog Camera You’ve Been Waiting For

Leica may have first gone digital over a decade ago, but don’t expect it to turn its back on analog cameras anytime soon. In fact, the German camera maker has just announced a new and rather exclusive analog release called the Leica M-A “Titan Set.” The limited-edition pairing, which consists of a mechanical camera and Summicron lens, shows the brand is still well aware of the hold analog equipment has on the world’s photographers.

At the heart of the set, and giving it its name, is the company’s M-A 35mm camera. It’s a completely mechanical model with no light metre or other electrical components, making it, the brand says, “a return to photography in its purest form.” While already a technical marvel, this version of the camera features a special titanium finish. That’s not all, though. All of its external parts are machined out of the metal—which is twice as hard as aluminum and weighing nearly half as much as brass—making this M-A even more durable and lightweight than its peers.

The set doesn’t just come with a camera, though. It also includes with Leica’s APO-Summicron-M 50 f/2 ASPH lens. Based on a model first produced in 1956, it’s the brand’s finest full-frame lens and will help any photographer sharpen their images. As with the camera, all of its external parts have been machined from solid titanium.

The new Leica M-A “Titan Set” marks just the sixth time Leica has released one of its cameras with a titanium exterior. That’s not the only reason why this set it so exclusive. It’ll also be limited to just 250 examples. The pair costs US$19,995 (just above RM88,000), which is about US$5,000 more than the camera (the base version is priced at US$5,595 or about RM25,000) and lens (US$9,095 or just over RM40,000) normally cost together.

If you like the idea of picking up an analog Leica, but want something even older, you’re in luck. A rare example of the camera that helped pave the way for the M-A and all the brand’s other 35mm models, the 0-Series, will be auctioned off this Saturday. Be warned, though, it will likely cost closer to US$3 million than US$20,000.

Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x full-frame anamorphic lens mini-review

Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x full frame anamorphic lens
In December 2021, Great Joy announced its first full-frame anamorphic lens, the 60mm T2.9 1.33x anamorphic. Now, the company is back with a new 50mm T2.9 1.8x anamorphic, and we’ve gone hands-on to see just how it performs.

What makes this new Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x anamorphic lens stand out is that with a squeeze factor of 1.8x it gives us a more dramatic anamorphic effect than most other budget anamorphic lenses, all while retaining a reasonably fast maximum aperture that covers full frame sensors, albeit sometimes with a slight crop for some camera models.

Fujifilm’s XF 18-120mm F4 LM PZ WR lens is parfocal, weather-sealed and will cost just $899

Fujifilm has announced the launch of the XF 18–120mm F4 LM PZ WR lens, a power zoom lens that offers a wide focal length range at a consistent F4 aperture. Fujifilm says this lens is designed for the hybrid creatives working with both stills and video, and is the first lens to be designed in ‘collaboration between FUJINON Optics and FUJIFILM X Series engineers.’

The 18–120mm F4 lens covers a full-frame equivalent focal length range of 27–183mm, making it a 6x optical zoom lens with power zoom functionality with a x0.2 maximum magnification ratio. The lens is constructed of 15 elements in 12 groups, including three aspherical elements and three extra-low dispersion (ED) elements.

The lens is fully electronic (aperture, focus and zoom) and features internal focus and zoom, meaning what you see is what you get—no extending barrel susceptible to dirt and debris. Speaking of the elements, the lens is weather-sealed at 13 locations and can operate down to –10°C (14°F).

For video shooters, Fujifilm has also added an aperture drive control that better suppresses exposure shift when adjusting the aperture while shooting, effectively giving you a clickless-style aperture with smooth transitions from one setting to the next. Other features include a minimum focusing distance of 60cm (24”), a seven-blade aperture diaphragm and a 72mm front filter thread.

Four different methods can be used to control the lens’ power zoom. The lens has a dedicated, speed-sensitive zoom ring, just behind the focus ring. Then, behind that, is a rocker ring that adjusts the zoom (or focus) at different rates, depending on how far you rotate it. The third is a dedicated ’T/W’ toggle on the left of the lens barrel, that drives the zoom at a consistent pace. Then, finally, there’s an on-screen touchscreen control on the camera (at the point of launch only the X-H2S has this capability but Fujifilm has said the X-T4, X-T3 and X-S10 will gain the feature via a firmware update).

Fujifilm says the lens is optically parfocal, meaning your subject will stay in focus, without adjusting the focus ring, throughout the entire focal length range. Its dimensions measure 77mm (3”) in diameter by 124mm (4.9”) long and it weighs approximately 460g (1lb).

The Fujinon XF 18–120mmF4 LM PZ WR is expected to be released September 2022 with an MSRP of $899 / $1,150CAD.

 

Most Used Cinema Lenses in Hollywood: Best Lenses

When you watch a mainstream Hollywood movie, you would notice, the visual properties are completely different from a budget film and music videos. They don’t look like a documentary or television flick. It has a look of its own. A wider perspective, distinctive picture quality, aesthetic camera movements, and sometimes out-of-the-world color experience. Ever wondered why?

I was struggling with observation since my early childhood. Being an 80ies kid and not having a filmmaker uncle, I didn’t have the opportunity to investigate my concern practically, but I knew, there must be some pricey secrets and investments that are restricted only to the rich people.

Growing up around movies like Jurassic Park, Titanic, Rambo, Terminator, etc made me even have cinematic dreams, and I looked up to them.

Why do movies look different from music videos and commercials? This concern is the oldest one when it comes to Filmmakers. The questions go like this:

Is it because of the cameras being used?
Is it the locations that stand out from the rest?
Or is it the lenses and cinematographer?
The answer is, it’s a combination of all the mentioned factors with post-production effort.

SOON after the 80ies, the visuals got better and better and here we are now standing with a bunch of cameras and lenses, still overpriced and financially restricted to the big-budget movie giants.

In this article, I am going to list out the most used lenses of this decade. Some of the lenses are personal favorites of renowned filmmakers like Christopher Nolan, Roger Deakins, Todd Philips, and Quentin Tarantino.

These lenses are yielding benchmark cinema performances and stand out from the rest of the lenses in the cinema industry.

Some of the most overused prime lenses are:
1: Arri signature primes:
These lenses come in various focal lengths and are made for Medium/large format cameras. The most commonly used signature primes are 32mm, 35mm, 40mm, and 24mm. Arri signature primes are used for its crisps Images. These lenses don’t distort and don’t flare when put to test. They have beautiful focus roll-off and subtle tones. The lens has consistent nice textures and rarely produces a noise when used in higher ISO. These lenses are used to shoot both wide shots and close-ups. Produces great depth of field and clean images

2: Cooke S4
These lenses are only 120 years old in the cinema industry comparable to other lenses in the same quality but still have made their place with their performance and versatility. In 2013 the company has earned Oscar Award for their innovation after which they gained positive attention from significant people. There are famous cinematographers who use these lenses in every project they do. In this decade Cooke lenses have made a remarkable change in the digital filmmaking process giving us the cinema look. The Cooke Look.

The Cooke lens gives you both speed and sharpness. They are known for a little amount of chromatic aberration which enhances the shots and gives a good contrast to your footage as well as produces good colors. The set of lenses when used suffices all your needs through an entire set. The lens is also known for the soft-focus falloff giving subjects in the images a touch of sweetness.

3: Leica Summilux-C
The Leica Summilux is developed by Ottomans and is a Band Pro brand specifically designed for cinema. These lenses are also known as the top-notch lens available in the Film-making industry. The specialty of the Leica lenses is that they are identical to look at (same length same width). The designer of the lens is Lan Niel (Oscar awarded)who is the same person who designed Panavision Primos. With precision design and built the lenses have a twenty-eight megapixels sensor which is compatible with up to 8k cameras. The beauty of the lenses is first seen in movies like Birdman, Whiplash, and Gone Girl.

4: Pena vision Primo
These Anamorphic lenses are known for their speed and artistic chromatic aberrations, high contrast and resolution, even field illumination, and negligible veiling glare, ghosting, and distortion which enhance the images to reach the cinema look. These lenses are too costly and are mostly rented because of the vintage optics being used. Also known for color balancing in focal lengths, these lenses can produce blue anamorphic flares without producing unwanted veiling glare.

 

Some of the popular zooms lenses are:

1: Pena vision primo 19/90mm
2: Fujinon Premista 80-250mm
3: Angenieux Optimo -24-290mm

Canon EOS R Mirrorless Gets Smaller with new APS-C Sensors and RF-S Lenses

Canon’s entry into high-end mirrorless camera gear industry with their first EOS R was not too big of a surprise. Mirrorless cameras are the future and Canon must step in and make a small dent to stay relevant too. What was surprising though was how much of an impact Canon is making in the mirrorless camera segment.

When they introduced their current flagships, the super powerful Canon EOS R3, the Canon EOS R5, and the brilliant EOS R6, it seemed like they got the formula right. They did what Sony did not do with the EOS R5 in introducing 8K video recording capability to it. While early reports suggests that the 8K video recording on the Canon EOS R5 is still a little finnicky, it gave us a glimpse of what Canon can really do when their stretch their legs and pull all the stops with their high-end camera.

They are not market leaders in the mirrorless segment, Sony still is the king of mirrorless cameras with the support system that they have built over the years. To be market leaders again, Canon cannot just stop at their high-end EOS R3, EOS R5 and EOS R6 full-frame shooters. They need to cover all their bases. That is where their APS-C mirrorless cameras come in.

To be fair, Canon did have a mirrorless compact camera. They had the EOS M series that is highly regarded by many still. Unfortunately, the EOS M series was short-lived with highly limited lens and accessory support. But it will be different this time with the new Canon EOS R series and the RF-S lenses.

They introduced two brand-new cameras in the EOS R7 and the EOS R10 mirrorless APS-C cameras. Alongside the new APS-C interchangeable lens cameras, Canon also launched new lenses that caters specifically to the APS-C format cameras called the RF-S range. In this case, you get the power of Canon’s brilliant EOS R series at a fraction of the price.

Canon EOS R7

Meet the new all-rounder that is the Canon EOS R7. It is powered by the same processor as the flagship class EOS R3, the DIGIC X image processor made for professional grade cameras. Thanks to the new image processor, the EOS R7 inherits the same fast autofocus system that the EOS R3 gets.

Thanks to the same processing power as well, the EOS R7 can shoot at up to 15fps in high-speed burst mode in mechanical shutter mode. In electronic shutter mode it can shoot at up to 30fps continuously. You can even shoot at RAW formats in that speed.

The Canon EOS R7 feature an impressive 32.5-Megapixel on tap. They also managed to fit a 5-axis in-boy Image Stabiliser mechanism within the body with up to eight stops of image stabilisation. The result for that is not just better still images, you also get much better and steady videos even if you are shooting without an external stabiliser rig.

The 32.5-Megapixel sensor captures videos at 4K with 7K oversampling for high-quality and detail rich videos at up to 30p. If you prefer to get more frames out of your videos though, you can switch it down to 4K UHD Standard mode that shoots at 4K resolution still but at 60p. For even better details and more freedom in colour grading, you can switch your camera to Canon Log 3 gamma profile.

Canon EOS R10

The Canon EOS R10 also packs the same DIGIC 3 image processor that allows it to also shoot at 15fps continuously in mechanical shutter mode. In electronic shutter mode it shoots at a slightly slower rate of 23fps. You still get 24.2-Megapixel out of the camera though, which should still prove to be mighty clear and detailed.

While it does not pack an in-body stabilisation mechanics, it has a built-in Movie Digital image stabilisation algorithm that allows the camera to simulate a 5-axis body stabiliser to allow for better and steadier video recordings even with lenses that does not come equipped with Optical Image Stabiliser. You still get to record videos at 4UK UHD at up to 30p with 6K oversampling in UHD Fine mode, no Canon Log 3 gamma colour profile to work with here though.

Canon RF-S lenses

The Canon EOS R10 also packs the same DIGIC 3 image processor that allows it to also shoot at 15fps continuously in mechanical shutter mode. In electronic shutter mode it shoots at a slightly slower rate of 23fps. You still get 24.2-Megapixel out of the camera though, which should still prove to be mighty clear and detailed.

While it does not pack an in-body stabilisation mechanics, it has a built-in Movie Digital image stabilisation algorithm that allows the camera to simulate a 5-axis body stabiliser to allow for better and steadier video recordings even with lenses that does not come equipped with Optical Image Stabiliser. You still get to record videos at 4UK UHD at up to 30p with 6K oversampling in UHD Fine mode, no Canon Log 3 gamma colour profile to work with here though.

Canon RF-S lenses

DSLR vs mirrorless cameras: pros and cons of each

Despite most manufacturers now dedicating their resources to developing mirrorless technology, the DSLR vs mirrorless camera buying decision isn’t so open and shut. There are still good reasons to buy a DSLR, even if there are more reasons to invest in a mirrorless camera.

Fewer DSLRs are being manufactured these days, but they are still being made. Those DSLRs that are being introduced to market represent the pinnacle of this technology. Buying a DSLR these days means you’re getting the fruits of more than a decade of technological refinements.

Mirrorless cameras have also come a long way from their humble beginnings when they were seen as more of a beginner’s camera (in some ways, this role has reversed). What were once called compact system cameras, or CSCs, are now the driving focus of just about every traditional camera brand, apart from Pentax. The great thing about the mirrorless format is that it is still near the beginning of its technological development.

Where you side in the great DSLR vs mirrorless cameras debate depends on your needs as a photographer. Do you need a workhorse with a long battery life and an extensive range of niche lenses to choose from? Or do you need something small and light, something fast and built to shoot video alongside your stills?

Before we debate the pros and cons of DSLR vs mirrorless cameras, let’s first explore what mirrorless technology means.

What is a mirrorless camera?
The clue is in the name. A mirrorless camera doesn’t have a mirror. In a DSLR, the image you see through the viewfinder is being reflected by a mirror in front of the sensor. When you press the shutter button, the mirror physically moves out of the way, allowing the light to hit the sensor. Mirrorless cameras do not have a mirror. The light passes through the lens and lands directly on the image sensor. You can see this image in real-time either on your camera’s LCD or within the electronic viewfinder (EVF), if it has one.

The mirror in DSLRs is just a reimagining of the technology that was used in film cameras for decades. For this reason, it works exceptionally well. But the advent of mirrorless technology has shown that it can improve upon some of the limitations of DSLR technology. Chief among these is speed and camera shake. As you can imagine, when shooting at slower shutter speeds the action of the moving mirror can cause small vibrations within the camera. Likewise, removing this process means a camera can operate faster.

What is a mirrorless camera?
The clue is in the name. A mirrorless camera doesn’t have a mirror. In a DSLR, the image you see through the viewfinder is being reflected by a mirror in front of the sensor. When you press the shutter button, the mirror physically moves out of the way, allowing the light to hit the sensor. Mirrorless cameras do not have a mirror. The light passes through the lens and lands directly on the image sensor. You can see this image in real-time either on your camera’s LCD or within the electronic viewfinder (EVF), if it has one.

The mirror in DSLRs is just a reimagining of the technology that was used in film cameras for decades. For this reason, it works exceptionally well. But the advent of mirrorless technology has shown that it can improve upon some of the limitations of DSLR technology. Chief among these is speed and camera shake. As you can imagine, when shooting at slower shutter speeds the action of the moving mirror can cause small vibrations within the camera. Likewise, removing this process means a camera can operate faster.

There are downsides, though. Smaller camera bodies may be awkward for people with large hands. Likewise, smaller camera bodies can be cumbersome to use with larger lenses. Others simply prefer the size and weight of a chunky DSLR.

For most photographers, though, a smaller body means less weight to carry, and more gear you can fit in your kit bag.

AF performance
Mirrorless camera owners benefit from having a single AF system. DSLRs have a phase detection AF system for when you’re shooting via the optical viewfinder and a contrast detection or phase detection AF system for when you’re using the live view screen.

In the early days of mirrorless, DSLRs could handily beat CSCs in AF speed despite switching between the two AF sensors. These days, however, mirrorless cameras boast much faster AF systems better than even the best DSLRs. Some of the best mirrorless cameras boast hybrid on-sensor AF systems that are faster, more accurate and precise than most other systems out there.

DSLR vs mirrorless for video?
Though recent DSLRs can record internal 4K video at 60p, mirrorless cameras have the edge here due to their superior AF systems as we described above. Not only are mirrorless camera AF systems faster and more accurate, but you can now often use Eye AF and subject tracking modes while recording video.

What’s more, most lenses for mirrorless systems are now designed with video in mind. They’re designed to be much quieter while filming.

Burst shooting and shutter speeds
As you can imagine, the lack of a mirror that needs to move every time you press the shutter button means that mirrorless cameras can take picture after picture much faster than a DSLR can. As a result, the frame rates in continuous shooting mode are much faster for mirrorless cameras than they are for DSLRs.

What’s more, mirrorless cameras can shoot at much faster shutter speeds than DSLRs by using what is called their electronic shutter. Mirrorless cameras have a mechanical shutter (though it’s worth noting that the Nikon Z9 eschews a mechanical shutter altogether) but have an option to shoot with an electronic shutter. This bypasses the mechanical shutter and tells the camera how long to let the sensor record the light.

There are downsides, though. Smaller camera bodies may be awkward for people with large hands. Likewise, smaller camera bodies can be cumbersome to use with larger lenses. Others simply prefer the size and weight of a chunky DSLR.

For most photographers, though, a smaller body means less weight to carry, and more gear you can fit in your kit bag.

AF performance
Mirrorless camera owners benefit from having a single AF system. DSLRs have a phase detection AF system for when you’re shooting via the optical viewfinder and a contrast detection or phase detection AF system for when you’re using the live view screen.

In the early days of mirrorless, DSLRs could handily beat CSCs in AF speed despite switching between the two AF sensors. These days, however, mirrorless cameras boast much faster AF systems better than even the best DSLRs. Some of the best mirrorless cameras boast hybrid on-sensor AF systems that are faster, more accurate and precise than most other systems out there.

DSLR vs mirrorless for video?
Though recent DSLRs can record internal 4K video at 60p, mirrorless cameras have the edge here due to their superior AF systems as we described above. Not only are mirrorless camera AF systems faster and more accurate, but you can now often use Eye AF and subject tracking modes while recording video.

What’s more, most lenses for mirrorless systems are now designed with video in mind. They’re designed to be much quieter while filming.

Burst shooting and shutter speeds
As you can imagine, the lack of a mirror that needs to move every time you press the shutter button means that mirrorless cameras can take picture after picture much faster than a DSLR can. As a result, the frame rates in continuous shooting mode are much faster for mirrorless cameras than they are for DSLRs.

What’s more, mirrorless cameras can shoot at much faster shutter speeds than DSLRs by using what is called their electronic shutter. Mirrorless cameras have a mechanical shutter (though it’s worth noting that the Nikon Z9 eschews a mechanical shutter altogether) but have an option to shoot with an electronic shutter. This bypasses the mechanical shutter and tells the camera how long to let the sensor record the light.

There are downsides, though. Smaller camera bodies may be awkward for people with large hands. Likewise, smaller camera bodies can be cumbersome to use with larger lenses. Others simply prefer the size and weight of a chunky DSLR.

For most photographers, though, a smaller body means less weight to carry, and more gear you can fit in your kit bag.

AF performance
Mirrorless camera owners benefit from having a single AF system. DSLRs have a phase detection AF system for when you’re shooting via the optical viewfinder and a contrast detection or phase detection AF system for when you’re using the live view screen.

In the early days of mirrorless, DSLRs could handily beat CSCs in AF speed despite switching between the two AF sensors. These days, however, mirrorless cameras boast much faster AF systems better than even the best DSLRs. Some of the best mirrorless cameras boast hybrid on-sensor AF systems that are faster, more accurate and precise than most other systems out there.

DSLR vs mirrorless for video?
Though recent DSLRs can record internal 4K video at 60p, mirrorless cameras have the edge here due to their superior AF systems as we described above. Not only are mirrorless camera AF systems faster and more accurate, but you can now often use Eye AF and subject tracking modes while recording video.

What’s more, most lenses for mirrorless systems are now designed with video in mind. They’re designed to be much quieter while filming.

Burst shooting and shutter speeds
As you can imagine, the lack of a mirror that needs to move every time you press the shutter button means that mirrorless cameras can take picture after picture much faster than a DSLR can. As a result, the frame rates in continuous shooting mode are much faster for mirrorless cameras than they are for DSLRs.

What’s more, mirrorless cameras can shoot at much faster shutter speeds than DSLRs by using what is called their electronic shutter. Mirrorless cameras have a mechanical shutter (though it’s worth noting that the Nikon Z9 eschews a mechanical shutter altogether) but have an option to shoot with an electronic shutter. This bypasses the mechanical shutter and tells the camera how long to let the sensor record the light.

 

What’s The Difference Between Mirrorless And DSLR Cameras?

Are you looking to invest in a new camera? There’s a wide array of choices out there and many different types of cameras to suit different purposes. DSLR cameras and mirrorless cameras are two types for mainly professional use, and if you’re looking into these, it’s best to know the differences between them before making a decision. There are marked distinctions between the two types of cameras, but neither is necessarily better than the other. The best camera for you depends mainly on the kind of shooting you are doing, as well as which features you prefer.

The main difference between a DSLR and a mirrorless camera is that a DSLR uses a mirror, while the mirrorless camera, of course, does not. This changes how each camera works, as well as the features they provide. Mirrorless cameras used to be better geared towards hobbyist use, but they have made great strides technology-wise over the years. You can now find many high-end mirrorless cameras for pro use, and it has become the preference for many photographers because of the advancements manufacturers have made.

What Is A DSLR Camera?

Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras are defined by their digital imaging sensors combined with the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera. This “reflex” is also what makes DSLRs different from other digital cameras, namely mirrorless cameras. The reflex mechanism involves the action of a mirror inside the body used to project light into the viewfinder or the sensor. Before you take a photo, that mirror is guiding light into the viewfinder. Once the photo is taken, the mirror flips to guide the light to the sensor.

DSLRs are the successor of film cameras using the SLR mechanism. They became popular during the 2000s and continued to be the camera of choice for many professionals for about a decade or so, as noted by Petr Nuska of Durham University. DSLRs were used especially for their video-taking capabilities at the time, as many amateur or budget filmmakers were drawn to the camera because of its ability to shoot high-quality video. Eventually, DSLRs spread into even more professional and commercial filmmaking, as their video quality neared the same level as some higher-end video cameras.

What Is A Mirrorless Camera?

Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras are defined by their digital imaging sensors combined with the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera. This “reflex” is also what makes DSLRs different from other digital cameras, namely mirrorless cameras. The reflex mechanism involves the action of a mirror inside the body used to project light into the viewfinder or the sensor. Before you take a photo, that mirror is guiding light into the viewfinder. Once the photo is taken, the mirror flips to guide the light to the sensor.

DSLRs are the successor of film cameras using the SLR mechanism. They became popular during the 2000s and continued to be the camera of choice for many professionals for about a decade or so, as noted by Petr Nuska of Durham University. DSLRs were used especially for their video-taking capabilities at the time, as many amateur or budget filmmakers were drawn to the camera because of its ability to shoot high-quality video. Eventually, DSLRs spread into even more professional and commercial filmmaking, as their video quality neared the same level as some higher-end video cameras.

What Is A Mirrorless Camera?

DSLR and mirrorless cameras work in different ways to take photos, and the outcomes of each of these may be preferable to some. The DSLR includes a mirror inside of its body that guides the light going through the lens at a 45-degree angle into the optical viewfinder, as explained by Adorama. This is where the image you see in this viewfinder comes from. Once you take your photo, the mirror flips so the light can reach the sensor underneath it. Then, the resulting picture is saved.

Mirrorless cameras, given their namesake, don’t have a mirror. The light travels directly to the sensor but is viewed electronically. When you take a photo, the light information on the sensor at that moment is saved. This is a very different method from the DSLR and has some advantages over that technology. Mirrorless cameras are lighter than their DSLR counterparts, for example, and they’re generally faster, easier to use, images are electronically stabilized, and you don’t have to worry about maintaining the mirror element. However, for some users a DSLR may be more suited to their needs, particularly because DSLRs support a wider variety of lenses and attachments. As well, DSLR cameras offer better battery life, which may be ideal when working in remote locations.

Which Type Of Camera Is Better?

DSLR and mirrorless cameras work in different ways to take photos, and the outcomes of each of these may be preferable to some. The DSLR includes a mirror inside of its body that guides the light going through the lens at a 45-degree angle into the optical viewfinder, as explained by Adorama. This is where the image you see in this viewfinder comes from. Once you take your photo, the mirror flips so the light can reach the sensor underneath it. Then, the resulting picture is saved.

Mirrorless cameras, given their namesake, don’t have a mirror. The light travels directly to the sensor but is viewed electronically. When you take a photo, the light information on the sensor at that moment is saved. This is a very different method from the DSLR and has some advantages over that technology. Mirrorless cameras are lighter than their DSLR counterparts, for example, and they’re generally faster, easier to use, images are electronically stabilized, and you don’t have to worry about maintaining the mirror element. However, for some users a DSLR may be more suited to their needs, particularly because DSLRs support a wider variety of lenses and attachments. As well, DSLR cameras offer better battery life, which may be ideal when working in remote locations.

Which Type Of Camera Is Better?

Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x full-frame anamorphic lens mini-review

Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x full frame anamorphic lens
In December 2021, Great Joy announced its first full-frame anamorphic lens, the 60mm T2.9 1.33x anamorphic. Now, the company is back with a new 50mm T2.9 1.8x anamorphic, and we’ve gone hands-on to see just how it performs.

What makes this new Great Joy 50mm T2.9 1.8x anamorphic lens stand out is that with a squeeze factor of 1.8x it gives us a more dramatic anamorphic effect than most other budget anamorphic lenses, all while retaining a reasonably fast maximum aperture that covers full frame sensors, albeit sometimes with a slight crop for some camera models.

Sony Believes That Smartphone Cameras Will Overpower DSLR Cameras By 2024, Here’s Why

Smartphone cameras are going to deliver better quality than digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras in the next three years. This enterprising claim has been made by Terushi Shimizu, President and CEO of Sony Semiconductor Solutions during a business briefing recently.

Smartphone camera quality has gone up with the advancement in sensor technology, something that Sony knows quite well. But it has been hard to see anyone forecast that cameras on mobile devices will surpass DSLR cameras, that too in the next few years.

Sony also had proof to justify its claims and says the still image quality will be the first to see the drastic change. As given in this report, Shimizu claims such a quality improvement will be made possible thanks to the combination of sensors, larger apertures and more importantly the use of computational photography.

We’ve already seen the capability of advanced AI features with the Google Pixel smartphones, and Sony seems to be angling towards the future with similar adoption by other phone makers.

In addition to this, you now have a situation where the megapixel count of the camera sensor is crossing new levels. Manufacturers like Samsung have already shown us the future with a 200-megapixel smartphone sensor in their armoury.

The likes of Sony, Oppo, and Vivo will have their own say in the sector with further innovation packed into the mobile devices. Phones like the Vivo X80 Pro and even Pixel 6 Pro are testament to the diverse nature of the photography space right now. And with additions like the periscope lens and microscopic sensor, things are going to be exciting in the coming years.

But that’s not all, Sony had more to share about the market forecast for years to come. The company says by 2025 smartphones will get a boost in high-speed video quality, and better auto-focus results.